Rhino 7 Warnings

Fact Checked On: 10-9-2018 By: Dr. Brian Straub, Pharm.D.

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Rhino 7 Drug Interactions and Warnings

(https://www.supplementcritique.com/rhino-7-review/)

There are many possible drug interactions that can occur with Rhino 7, as well as potential interactions with certain medical conditions.

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We have listed all of the ingredients below, and there potential warnings.

Note: This list is NOT comprehensive. You should still check with your doctor before taking Rhino 7 or any other supplement.

Goji Extract

Potential Disease State Interactions:

Allergic reactions: Goji might cause an allergic reaction in people who are allergic to tobacco, peaches, tomatoes, and nuts.

Diabetes: Goji might lower blood sugar.

It might cause blood sugar to drop too much if you are taking medications for diabetes.

Monitor your blood sugar levels carefully.

Low blood pressure: Goji might lower blood pressure.

If your blood pressure is already low, taking goji might make it drop too much.

Potential Drug Interactions:

Goji extract is metabolized by enzymes in your liver. Taking Goji berry extract may slow the down the speed at which other medications are broken down by your liver.

Some drugs include: amitriptyline (Elavil), diazepam (Valium), zileuton (Zyflo), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Voltaren), fluvastatin (Lescol), glipizide (Glucotrol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), irbesartan (Avapro), losartan (Cozaar), phenytoin (Dilantin), piroxicam (Feldene), tamoxifen (Nolvadex), tolbutamide (Tolinase), torsemide (Demadex), warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Goji extract might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar.

Taking Goji along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low.

Monitor your blood sugar closely.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Goji extract may reduce blood pressure. If you are taking current medications for high blood pressure, monitor your blood pressure closely at the start.

Some medications for high blood pressure include captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), losartan (Cozaar), valsartan (Diovan), diltiazem (Cardizem), Amlodipine (Norvasc), hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDiuril), furosemide (Lasix), and many others.

Goji may slow down the rate at which your blood clots. Use caution when taking this extract with blood thinners (warfarin) as it may lead to increased bruising and risk of bleeds.

Be sure to have your blood checked regularly.

The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.

Deng Sen Extract

Potential Disease State Interactions:

Unknown.

Potential Drug Interactions:

Unknown

Atractylodes

Potential Disease State Interactions:

Unknown.

Potential Drug Interactions:

Unknown.

Cinnamon Bark

Potential Disease State Interactions:

Diabetes: Cinnamon bark might lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes.

Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use cinnamon bark.

Low blood pressure: Cinnamon bark might lower blood pressure.

Taking cinnamon bark might cause blood pressure to drop too low in people who already have low blood pressure.

Surgery: Cinnamon bark can affect blood pressure and blood sugar levels and might interfere with blood pressure and blood sugar control during and after surgery.

Stop taking cinnamon at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Potential Drug Interactions:

Cinnamon bark might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar.

Taking cinnamon bark along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low.

Monitor your blood sugar closely.

The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Dismutase and Superoxide Dismutase

Unknown.

Clinical effectiveness has only been shown via injection.

Cuscuta

Potential Disease State Interactions:

Unknown.

Potential Drug Interactions:

Unknown

Licorice

Potential Disease State Interactions:

Heart disease: Licorice can cause the body to store water, and this can make congestive heart failure worse.

Licorice can also increase the risk of irregular heartbeat.

Don’t consume licorice if you have heart disease.

Hormone-sensitive conditions such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: Licorice might act like estrogen in the body.

If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, don’t use licorice.

High blood pressure: Licorice can raise blood pressure.

Don’t consume large amounts of it if you have high blood pressure.

A muscle condition caused by nerve problems (hypertonia): Licorice can cause the level of potassium to drop in the blood.

This can make hypertonia worse.

Avoid licorice if you have hypertonia.

Low potassium levels in the blood (hypokalemia): Licorice can lower potassium in the blood.

If your potassium is already low, licorice might make it too low.

Don’t use licorice if you have this condition.

Kidney disease: Overuse of licorice could make kidney disease worse.

Don’t use it.

Sexual problems in men: Licorice can lower a man’s interest in sex and also worsen erectile dysfunction (ED) by lowering levels of a hormone called testosterone.

Surgery: Licorice might interfere with blood pressure control during and after surgery.

Stop taking licorice at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Potential Drug Interactions:

Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. The body breaks down warfarin (Coumadin) to get rid of it.

Licorice might increase the breakdown and decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin).

Decreasing the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin) might increase the risk of clotting.

Be sure to have your blood checked regularly.

The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.

Digoxin (Lanoxin) interacts with licorice. Large amounts of licorice can decrease potassium levels in the body.

Low potassium levels can increase the side effects of digoxin (Lanoxin).

Licorice may interact with medications used for hypertension by altering the level of potassium levels in the body as well as increasing blood pressure. Some medications used for hypertension include ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Thalitone), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDIURIL, Microzide), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), losartan (Cozaar), valsartan (Diovan), diltiazem (Cardizem), amlodipine (Norvasc), and others.

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2B6, 2C9 and 3A4 substrates) interact with licorice. Licorice might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications.

Taking licorice along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications.

Before taking licorice talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some of these medications changed by the liver include ketamine (Ketalar), phenobarbital, orphenadrine (Norflex), secobarbital (Seconal), dexamethasone (Decadron), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Voltaren), fluvastatin (Lescol), glipizide (Glucotrol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), irbesartan (Avapro), losartan (Cozaar), phenytoin (Dilantin), piroxicam (Feldene), tamoxifen (Nolvadex), tolbutamide (Tolinase), torsemide (Demadex), warfarin (Coumadin), lovastatin (Mevacor), ketoconazole (Nizoral), itraconazole (Sporanox), fexofenadine (Allegra), triazolam (Halcion), and many others.

Medications for inflammation (Corticosteroids) interact with licorice.

Some medications for inflammation can decrease potassium in the body.

Licorice might also decrease potassium in the body.

Taking licorice along with some medications for inflammation might decrease potassium in the body too much.

Some medications for inflammation include dexamethasone (Decadron), hydrocortisone (Cortef), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisone (Deltasone), and others.

Condonopsis (Dangshen)

Potential Disease State Interactions:

Bleeding disorders: Codonopsis might slow blood clotting and increase bleeding.

In theory, taking codonopsis might make bleeding disorders worse.

Surgery: Codonopsis might slow blood clotting.

In theory, taking codonopsis might increase the risk for bleeding during and after surgical procedures.

Stop using codonopsis at least two weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Potential Drug Interactions:

Unknown.

Cordyceps Sinesis

Potential Disease State Interactions:

“Auto-immune diseases” such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or other conditions: Cordyceps might cause the immune system to become more active.

This could increase the symptoms of auto-immune diseases.

If you have one of these conditions, it’s best to avoid using cordyceps.

Bleeding disorders: Cordyceps might slow blood clotting.

Taking cordyceps might increase the risk of bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Surgery: Using cordyceps might increase the risk of bleeding during surgery.

Stop taking cordyceps 2 weeks before surgery.

Potential Drug Interactions:

Cordyceps might increase the immune system. By increasing the immune system, cordyceps might decrease the effectiveness of medications that decrease the immune system.

Some medications that decrease the immune system include azathioprine (Imuran), basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), daclizumab (Zenapax), muromonab-CD3 (OKT3, Orthoclone OKT3), mycophenolate (CellCept), tacrolimus (FK506, Prograf), sirolimus (Rapamune), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), corticosteroids (glucocorticoids), prednisolone, prednisone and others.

Rubus

Potential Disease State Interactions:

Unknown.

Potential Drug Interactions:

Unknown

Panax Ginseng

Potential Disease State Interactions:

“Auto-immune diseases” such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or other conditions: Panax ginseng seems to increase the activity of the immune system.

It might make auto-immune diseases worse.

Don’t use Panax ginseng if you have any auto-immune condition.

Bleeding conditions: Panax ginseng seems to interfere with blood clotting.

Don’t use Panax ginseng if you have a bleeding condition.

Heart conditions: Panax ginseng can affect heart rhythm and blood pressure slightly on the first day it is used.

However, there are usually no changes with continued use.

Nevertheless, Panax ginseng has not been studied in people with cardiovascular disease.

Use Panax ginseng with caution if you have heart disease.

Diabetes: Panax ginseng might lower blood sugar.

In people with diabetes who are taking medications to lower blood sugar, adding Panax ginseng might lower blood sugar too much.

Monitor your blood sugar closely if you have diabetes and use Panax ginseng.

Organ transplant: Panax ginseng might make the immune system more active.

This could interfere with the effectiveness of medications that are given after an organ transplant to reduce the chance that the organ will be rejected.

If you have received an organ transplant, don’t use Panax ginseng.

Schizophrenia (a mental disorder): High doses of Panax ginseng have been linked with sleep problems and agitation in people with schizophrenia.

Be careful when using Panax ginseng if you have schizophrenia.

Organ transplant: Panax ginseng might make the immune system more active.

This could interfere with the effectiveness of medications that are given after an organ transplant to reduce the chance that the organ will be rejected.

If you have received an organ transplant, don’t use Panax ginseng.

Potential Drug Interactions:

Alcohol interacts with Panax Ginseng. The body breaks down alcohol to get rid of it.

Taking Panax ginseng might increase how fast your body gets rid of alcohol.

Caffeine interacts with Panax Ginseng. Caffeine can speed up the nervous system.

By speeding up the nervous system, caffeine can make you feel jittery and speed up your heartbeat.

Panax ginseng might also speed up the nervous system.

Taking Panax ginseng along with caffeine might cause serious problems including increased heart rate and high blood pressure.

Avoid taking caffeine along with Panax ginseng.

Insulin and medications for diabetes interact with Panax ginseng. Panax ginseng might decrease blood sugar.

Insulin is also used to decrease blood sugar.

Taking Panax ginseng along with insulin might cause your blood sugar to be too low.

Monitor your blood sugar closely.

The dose of your insulin might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Medications changed by the liver interacts with Panax ginseng. Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver.

Panax ginseng might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications.

Taking Panax ginseng along with some medications that are changed by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of your medication.

Before taking Panax ginseng talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications that are changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), clozapine (Clozaril), codeine, desipramine (Norpramin), donepezil (Aricept), fentanyl (Duragesic), flecainide (Tambocor), fluoxetine (Prozac), meperidine (Demerol), methadone (Dolophine), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), olanzapine (Zyprexa), ondansetron (Zofran), tramadol (Ultram), trazodone (Desyrel), and others.

Medications for depression (MAOIs) interacts with Panax ginseng. Panax ginseng might stimulate the body.

Some medications used for depression can also stimulate the body.

Taking Panax ginseng with these medications used for depression might cause too much stimulation.

This might cause side effects such as anxiousness, headache, restlessness, and insomnia.

Some of these medications used for depression include phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), and others.

Medications that decrease the immune system (Immunosuppressants) interacts with Panax ginseng. Panax ginseng increases the immune system.

By increasing the immune system, Panax ginseng might decrease the effectiveness of medications that decrease the immune system.

Some medications that decrease the immune system include azathioprine (Imuran), basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), daclizumab (Zenapax), muromonab-CD3 (OKT3, Orthoclone OKT3), mycophenolate (CellCept), tacrolimus (FK506, Prograf), sirolimus (Rapamune), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), corticosteroids (glucocorticoids), and others.

Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with Panax ginseng. Panax ginseng might slow blood clotting.

Taking Panax ginseng along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Stimulant drugs interacts with Panax ginseng. Stimulant drugs speed up the nervous system.

By speeding up the nervous system, stimulant medications can make you feel jittery and speed up your heartbeat.

Panax ginseng might also speed up the nervous system.

Taking Panax ginseng along with stimulant drugs might cause serious problems including increased heart rate and high blood pressure.

Avoid taking stimulant drugs along with Panax ginseng.

Some stimulant drugs include diethylpropion (Tenuate), epinephrine, phentermine (Ionamin), pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), and many others.

Blood thinners such as warfarin (Coumadin) interact with Panax ginseng. Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting.

There is some concern that Panax ginseng might decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin).

But it’s not clear if this interaction is a big problem.

Be sure to have your blood checked regularly.

The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.

Puereria Lobata

Potential Disease State Interactions:

Bleeding or blood clotting disorders: Puereria lobata might slow blood clotting.

It might make bleeding and blood clotting disorders worse, and it might also interfere with medications used as treatment.

Cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) conditions: There is a concern that Puereria lobata might interfere with cardiovascular treatments.

Puereria lobata seems to lower blood pressure and affect heart rhythm in animals.

Diabetes: Puereria lobata might affect blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.

Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use Puereria lobata.

Liver disease: There is some concern that taking Puereria lobata might harm the liver.

In theory, Puereria lobata might make liver diseases, such as hepatitis, worse.

People with liver disease or a history of liver disease should avoid Puereria lobata.

Surgery: Puereria lobata might affect blood sugar levels and might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery.

Stop taking Puereria lobata at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Potential Drug Interactions:

Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interact with Puereria lobata. Puereria lobata might slow blood clotting.

Taking Puereria lobata along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Methotrexate (MTX, Rheumatrex) interacts with Puereria lobate. Puereria lobata might decrease how fast the body gets rid of methotrexate (Rheumatrex).

This might increase the risk of methotrexate side effects.

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with Puereria lobate. Puereria lobata might decrease blood sugar.

Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar.

Taking Puereria lobata along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low.

Monitor your blood sugar closely.

The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Sources:

https://www.medcircle.com/knowledgebase/43585-goji

https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/natural/1025.html

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-330/cinnamon-bark

https://www.medicinenet.com/cinnamon_bark/supplements-vitamins.htm

https://www.emedicinehealth.com/licorice-page3/vitamins-supplements.htm

https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/natural/773.html



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Author: Dr. Brian Straub, Pharm.D.

Brian Straub is a medical science liaison and licensed clinical pharmacist. He graduated from the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy in 2011, and is also a registered yoga instructor.