Accelleral Review

Rob Miller | July 18, 2018
Product Reviewed: Accelleral
| 1 OUT OF 5 | Review by:
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Imagine popping one ‘smart pill’ and suddenly becoming the most productive person at your job.

Within a few weeks of taking the pill you get a promotion…

Then a month later you get another promotion.

Your co-workers start calling you ‘Superman’, and before you know it you’re running the joint.

via GIPHY

That’d be nice. Right?

Well, that’s essentially what the product Accelleral promises to do for you.

This ‘Breakthrough Brain Enhancing’ pill is being sold as a fast-acting ‘Adderall replacement’.

Check out this advertisement I recently came across.

Accelleral scam is said to be an adderall replacement

But is Accelleral legit?

Or is it just another bogus product being marketed in the scammiest way possible?

I’m gonna share everything you need to know about Accelleral, and blast it for what it is.

So hang tight, we’re gonna have a little fun.

What is Accelleral?

Accellerol cognitive brain formula

Supposedly it’s a memory enhancer brain-booster that will change your life on a dime if you’ll only give it a try.

According to a breaking ‘news story’ about Accelleral…

The fake brain booster Accelleral promises to boost memory and concentration

Fake marketing behind Accelleral

Just the other day I was served an advertisement that looked a helluva lot like breaking news from a reputable site.

Accelleral faked a news story on Business Insider

So I did what most people would do, I clicked in to read the news.

And here’s what I saw…

Accelleral fake news story

So…

At first glance, it looks harmless enough.

But I’ve been doing this long enough to know better.

This is just the tip of the ‘scam-berg’, if you will.

This is becoming a HUGE problem.

So many good people are being scammed out of their hard-earned money by fake products that don’t work.

via GIPHY

AARP is one of many reputable sources now warning their readers of this possibility. (Ironically enough, I’ve been served ads by AARP for similar product scams… but that’s neither here nor there).

FDA warns of scams like Accelleral
Image: aarp.org

But what should you be looking out for?

And how do you know Accelleral is one of these scams?

Well, let’s take a closer look at the Accelleral advertisement and have a look at some common themes you’ll find in fake articles, or ‘Farticles’.

Common themes to look out for in scams like Accelleral

#1 – Notice that fake URL? TodaysBigDeals.com?

Go ahead and type it in your browser, it’ll take you nowhere.

That’s because it’s not a news site at all, it’s simply a landing page that cannot be tracked to an owner.

#2 – Very ‘newsy’ headline in look and tone.Accelleral uses the tried-and-true scam-tactic of name-dropping prominent figures to catch our attention, and a little mystery to keep us reading. What IS Carson’s discovery?!

And damn right I should have access to it!

Scams like Accelleral use fake headlines promising the world

#3 – A picture of Ben Carson himself.We’ll see this scam-tactic used all throughout the ‘news story’.

#4 – More BS to keep us on the edge of our seats.Ben Carson is a doctor after all, so if he says it’ll be ‘the biggest event in human history’, we should listen up!

#5 – Ben Carson now credits his incredible focus to a specific brain booster. What ever could it be? 

via GIPHY

By this point, we’re hooked. What is this breakthrough brain booster? What is Ben’s discovery?

And how can I get MY hands on it?

They pull us deeper into the story, dropping even more celeb names (this time Bill O’Reilly) and even include a super-generic video about brain pills that says nothing about Accelleral.

Accelleral exposed

As we read on we come across even more name dropping, this time accompanied with BOLD claims about the product’s effectiveness.

The ‘news story’ says…

“Everyone that has taken this, from athletes like Tom Brady to actors like Robert De Niro have nothing but praise for the brain booster, which doubles IQ, skyrockets energy levels and connects areas of the brain not previously connected.

Accelleral works so well for these guys, we had to ask… Is it safe?”

Hell no it’s not safe! (But we’ll get to that in a bit).

Sheesh, these claims are so ridiculous that I wonder how anyone falls for it.

I mean, Tom Brady and Robert De Niro?

It’s like they just Googled “famous celebrities and sports stars” and pulled from the top of the list.

So little effort. Tisk, tisk. 

Accelleral exposed as a scam.<br><br>Tom Brady does not take the brain boosting pill.

BUT… people are falling for it.

Because it’s human nature to strive to be smarter, more focused, more energized, and better all around.

In other words, we want everything that Accelleral is selling.

We want it to be true.

Moving right along…

At this point, I’m sure you’re wondering who’s the brainchild (or brainchildren) behind this miracle pill?

Well Harvard Scientists of course!

Accelleral claims Harvard Scientists created this brain booster

They go on to add a few fake testimonials for fake social proof. Works every time.

Then, why not add an image of a couple more celebrities for good measure?

Accelleral exposed

I’m gonna go out on a limb and say this pill does NOT work for an ordinary person like me.

Also, thanks Accelleral for doing me a solid and updating the story on July 14… AKA the VERY DAY I’m reading it!

Seriously, check it out… some may call it a coincidence.

I call it a scam-wincidence.

Oh, and btw, Denzel Washington endorses the product too.

Go figure.

Accelleral fake news exposed

Also, they claim “CNN broke the news first and uncovered that Accelleral raises levels of focus and performance every day by 300%."

Ha!

Well, I took the liberty to do a quick search for “CNN + Accelleral."

CNN never wrote about Accelleral.<br><br>It's a lie

And guess what? I got NO results.

Zip, zero, zilch, nothing!

OK, well I did get something… I got this Forbes article all about how fake news articles are using billionaires to market their products.

Talk about Irony! (Forbes has served me similar ads in the past, too).

Forbes writes an article about how Fake News articles and lies are used to market iffy products like Accelleral
Image: forbes.com

The ad goes on to show a photo of Stephen Hawking, who supposedly has “admitted to using Accelleral to triple his memory."

What’s that I smell?

Is that some more Accelleral bullshit?

Accelleral is not endorsed by celebrities like Stephen Hawking because it is a scam

As we scroll down toward the bottom of the ad, fake Bill O’Reilly shares his fake experience taking Accelleral.

He gives us a play-by-play of his 14-day experience with the product, which is 100% glowing of course.

And sums it up by saying…

Accelleral claims that Bill O'Reilly tried the product, but he did not

Riiiiiight. Thanks Billy.

Now the moment of truth.

They try to sell us on a ‘Risk Free Trial’ of the fake brain-booster supplement… Will we bite?

Accelleral exposed as a scam

Didn’t think so.

Accelleral Reviews

You can search to your heart’s content looking for real user reviews for Accelleral, but you won’t find a damn thing.

However, in the fake news story, they really lay it on heavy with the ‘social proof’.

That’s right, at the very bottom of the ‘news story’ you’ll find a whole thread of Facebook comments praising the supplement. #bogustestimonials #faketestes

Accelleral fake user reviews

Yup, just like everything else in the advertisement, THESE ARE NOT REAL! Seriously, try to leave a comment of your own and you’ll see it doesn’t work. Scam-tastic!

Accelleral FAQ’s

via GIPHY

Who makes Accelleral?

That’s the million-dollar question.

Or one of them at least.

Probably some shady, off-shore factory.

I did a search for the makers of the product, and I came up bone dry.

But after scrolling down the page some, I found a company called ‘Excelerol.’

Notice the difference in spelling…

In searching for Accelerol, I found Excelerol
Image: excelerol.com

Now I doubt this is the same company/product as Accelleral, but you never know.

It is a “brain health supplement” after all.

At least Excelerol has a legitimate website.

What are the ingredients in Accelleral?

Let’s be real…

It’s a mystery cocktail of who-the-heck-knows?!

If they go this far to scam people into buying the product, who’s to say the formula is legit.

I can almost guarantee it’s not.

In the advertisement, the only mention of ingredients is this…

Accelleral is a scam brain booster

“Natural vitamins and minerals." Gee, thanks.

Accelleral side effects

The side effects of Accelleral include everything up to and including:

  • You flushing your hard-earned money down the toilet
  • So just don’t do it
  • Seriously
If you buy Accelleral you will be flushing your money down the toilet.
Image: greenlivingideas.com

If you DO buy the stuff, the best case scenario you can hope for is that you a.) actually get a bottle in the mail, and b.) don’t die.

Well OK, in all fairness, while the product might not be harmful (I honestly can’t say either way), I’m almost certain it won’t increase your memory or focus by 300% as it claims to.

Recommendations

I think by now you know where I stand on this product.

Accelleral is definitely a no-go and not worth it.

via GIPHY

Unfortunately, good people are getting scammed left and right by fake news stories selling fake products like this one.

So I hope I was able to shed some light on what to look out for, and how not to get duped.

If for some reason you do happen to get scammed, AARP educates us on how to possibly recoup our losses.

They say…

Here's what to do if you get scammed by a product like Accelleral
Image: aarp.org

Anyhow, best of luck out there in the wild west of the interwebs, and happy hunting for a brain booster supplement that actually works.

Have you tried Accelleral?

If so, write your review in the comments below!

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It’s made up of a high quality combination of all natural ingredients that are designed to promote laser focus, increase memory, cognition, and energy, and help to improve overall concentration.

Click Here to learn more in my official review.



User Reviews

Stephanie mckown's Review


By  Stephanie mckown Aug 6, 2018

I was one of the idiots that fell for this scam. Until now I didn't think it was even though the product didn't do anything for me.

 

I received my free bottle thinking that if I liked it I could contact them to set up an auto ship or something. I made sure I read all the fine print because I don't like getting roped into those auto shipments before trying the product.

 

Got another bottle in my mail today. Tried calling the 2 numbers given on the shipment paper and no answer at either number.

 

Called my bank and told them this was an unauthorized purchase so they shut my card down. Never again I guess.

 

I'm all about supplements and feeling better naturally so this was a lesson learned.

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Mary kuffner's Review


By  Mary kuffner Jul 18, 2018

My husband took this product for four days and he lost his coordination. He could not remember simple things and he wanted to sleep all the time. It took four days for him to get back to normal.

 

If you take any other medications do not take this!

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Author: Rob Miller

Rob Miller founded SupplementCritique.com over 7 years ago, and has been the chief editor ever since. He has a diploma in Advanced Dietary Supplements Advisor, and worked at GNC for 3 years. He KNOWS supplements, both inside and out. Rob currently resides in Jupiter, FL, with his wife of 4 years.  Learn more about him in his Bio here. Follow him on Twitter or find him on Google +.